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20100101
20100131
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
talked-about the youth of america and how concerned they are about their future. do you think they are concerned with your future? if so, what do you think your future will be? >> as of right now, the way things are looking and the way the amount of government -- the amount of money to cover it is spending, i am not a fan of the health care bill and i am concerned about the monday that bill will straddle the youth of america with. instead of being worried we are not specifically involved, we should be worried about what the state of the country is that they will leave us. i have seen more youth and college students, especially with the election last year, become very passionate about politics. i have seen the growing. but think we are on the right trend within our generation. i think the biggest thing the older generation can do is look at what they will leave us and the state of the nation that will lead us rather than worrying about what we are not getting out to vote. >> with your source of news? >> i cycled through a couple of newspapers in boston. i am partial to fox news
. there is a home ownership gap in america. the difference between an all- america and african-american and hispanic home ownership is too big. we have to address this. by the year 2010, we must increase minority homeowners by at least 5.5 million. >> is this where you thought to politics started -- bought the politics started? >> wiig shows phil gramm -- there were a lot of things that happened, but the legislation in december of 2000 was the big one. it basically said that you could not outlaw derivatives. if you read it, it protects these derivatives and allowed them to just ballooned beyond control. phil gramm was instrumental in that. you will remember michael green berger who is now a lawyer and a professor, he was a regulator. he was on the commodity futures trading commission. as early as 1998, he would have liked to outlaw these kinds of derivatives that have gotten us into some much trouble. he said that that point was the critical moment and that phil gramm was the person that pushed that through. >> were to happen to get that video -- where did you happen to get that video? >> he is enjo
, not solely within afghanistan. >> you hear adults in this town all the time talk about the youth of america and how concerned they are about your future. do you think they're really concerned and if so, what do you think your future is going to be? >> as of right now, the amount of money that the governor has been spending i'm not a huge fan of the current health care bill and i'm worried about the debt that bill is going to straddle the youth of america with. instead of being worried that we're not necessarily fully civically involved they need to worry about the state of the country that they're going to leave us. i've seen more youth and more college students become more passionate about politician so i think we're on the right trend within our generational years. i think the biggest thing that the older generations can do is look at what they're going to leave us and the state of the nation they're going to leave us rather than worrying why all of us don't go out to vote and so on. >> what's your news source? >> i look at "the boston globe" and boston heard. i am partial to fox news. i
. there is a home ownership gap in america. the difference between anglo america and african american/hispanic home ownership is too big. we've got to focus the attention of this nation to address this. and it starts with setting a goal and so by the year 2010 we must increase minority homeowners by at least 5 and half million. >> was that right? is this where you thought the politics of all this started? phil gramm, george bush? >> well we chose phil gramm because, you know, there were a lot of things that happened. you can chose a lot of dates but the legislation in december of 2000 was the really big one because it said basically that you couldn't outlaw derivatives. you couldn't -- it made it if you read it it's very clear that it protects these derivatives, credit default swaps, et cetera. and it allowed them to just balloon beyond control. and gramm was very -- was absolutely instrumental in that. and remember michael greenberger who's voice you hear and who's talking about it who's now, you know, he's a lawyer and professor at the university of maryland law school. greenberger was a regulato
was a very young journalist in palestine, but what he described about russia, britain and france and america and, he wrote about the saudi arabians that he called bolsheviks. he'd trained himself as a journalist but he tired of the zionism. he moved to paris, briefly and then to berlin. he became a journalist with the main group of newspapers. because of his interest in science, he quickly got promoted to science editor. people forgot this when he turned to writing about science later in life that he had this intense experience for two or three years in germany. >> by the way, he wrote how many books? >> 34, all total. >> how many are novels and how many are non-fiction? >> there are five novels, a couple of plays and the rest are nonfiction. >> of the nonfiction, which were the most successful? >> the most successful -- all of his nonfiction was pretty successful. i make the case in my book that one of the reasons that he has been more forgotten than he should have been was that people tend to think of him as a novelist because of "darkness of noon." ÑiÑiparticularly, in his autobiographa
wright talks, he says it is white america. they say the same thing of any country that is against the gospel. when anything happens there, they say it is cursed by got. it is a warped theology, but is in no way, racist. >> that is a critical job. i do not know if they showed you -- as important as the call she puts up are the calls that she does not allow. that is the gate that all comments must pass through. every morning, she provides a list of stories that could be six or seven pages long. she is very much a part of the editorial process. given the kind of small network, sheet runs the school but we are part of. she keeps us on track and sometimes you might get a little bit too far out in one direction and she can help bring us back. she had a very successful career in seattle. the guy that is the program director had been out there and brought her to washington when we actually conceived the "the grandy and andy morning show." we also do a thing at the end of the week which are the top sound bites. about was her idea. she has been a very important part of the content and quali
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)